Posts Tagged ‘Diocese’


Pope Francis met with Prime Minister Trudeau and said he would consider a papal apology for the horrors of residential schools. This week (Holy Week, the week of the voiceless claiming their voice, and worth in their intrinsic personhood) his considerations ended.

The answer? NO! (some nicer words were used about not being able to issue a personal apology for the Vatican, but we know this is trite and the essence of a cover you butt memo).

Why I (a close but never true Catholic) and many other Canadian Catholics are not buying it? Because it is not about what is right. It is not about what the Jesuit who chose my patron’s name as his, Francis of Assisi would call to be right in the gospel teaching of Love your Neighbour.

Down to brass tacks, it is not what Brother Jesus taught in accountability, love, hope, faith, peace and the very Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation which the world is trying to move into a phase of. A Truth and Reconciliation process to move forward together as the one family we are in humanity.

Yet these old institutions, like the Sanhedrin and Empire keep attempting to assert their control. The Vatican knows that the Indigenous people of the world, and of Canada would not have the monies to outlast a civil law suit against the Vaticans coffers without “proof”. Now there is proof, I would challenge the Indigenous of the world (and yes this includes groups not normally thought of, like the Irish) who suffered in Catholic or church run schools or institutions to take them to the International Criminal Court on Human Rights grounds. More to the point, continue the local civil court pressure of suing the parishes and dioceses, they cease to exist because they are not willing to move into a healthier space then so be it.

But that is the rub.

The Vatican, via the Pope, with this momentous NO, is doing nothing more than covering its assets. They have seen what has happened to churches not structured like the pyramid scheme the Roman Catholic Church is. They legally know that if the Pope says “Sorry” then the throne and all the riches are culpable and able to be named in each civil action.

The Pope is covering the Religious Controllers, the remnants of the Empire that began inter-generational trauma; politically and financially-nothing more. In the midst of Holy Week. The week that started with the celebration of personhood for those that were told they did not matter. The journey that took us to the meal shared; the institution of the Sacrament of Service; the culmination of radical love; the betrayal with a kiss…to today…after all the laws were broken of the religious controllers that made them “Holy” in their own eyes…to protect the institution… and the beaten and bloodied poor were hung upon a cross…and at the hour…life left him…and Brother Jesus was lowered into a tomb.

The Pope did not use 30 pieces of silver to betray that which his papacy has been teaching. He used an English idiom. “Consider”.

The Pope in one action held the status quo, and showed the Christianities are still based on that which Jesus rallied against.  The neighbour does not matter if there is money and power at play.

This is the Good Friday reflection that came from contemplating these words of today from the Community that brought us the mystic and communal Gospel of John, what resonates in your heart of an injustice done to maintain silence and the illusion of holiness:

John 18:1-19:42:
18:1 After Jesus had spoken these words, he went out with his disciples across the Kidron valley to a place where there was a garden, which he and his disciples entered.

18:2 Now Judas, who betrayed him, also knew the place, because Jesus often met there with his disciples.

18:3 So Judas brought a detachment of soldiers together with police from the chief priests and the Pharisees, and they came there with lanterns and torches and weapons.

18:4 Then Jesus, knowing all that was to happen to him, came forward and asked them, “Whom are you looking for?”

18:5 They answered, “Jesus of Nazareth.” Jesus replied, “I am he.” Judas, who betrayed him, was standing with them.

18:6 When Jesus said to them, “I am he,” they stepped back and fell to the ground.

18:7 Again he asked them, “Whom are you looking for?” And they said, “Jesus of Nazareth.”

18:8 Jesus answered, “I told you that I am he. So if you are looking for me, let these men go.”

18:9 This was to fulfill the word that he had spoken, “I did not lose a single one of those whom you gave me.”

18:10 Then Simon Peter, who had a sword, drew it, struck the high priest’s slave, and cut off his right ear. The slave’s name was Malchus.

18:11 Jesus said to Peter, “Put your sword back into its sheath. Am I not to drink the cup that the Father has given me?”

18:12 So the soldiers, their officer, and the Jewish police arrested Jesus and bound him.

18:13 First they took him to Annas, who was the father-in-law of Caiaphas, the high priest that year.

18:14 Caiaphas was the one who had advised the Jews that it was better to have one person die for the people.

18:15 Simon Peter and another disciple followed Jesus. Since that disciple was known to the high priest, he went with Jesus into the courtyard of the high priest,

18:16 but Peter was standing outside at the gate. So the other disciple, who was known to the high priest, went out, spoke to the woman who guarded the gate, and brought Peter in.

18:17 The woman said to Peter, “You are not also one of this man’s disciples, are you?” He said, “I am not.”

18:18 Now the slaves and the police had made a charcoal fire because it was cold, and they were standing around it and warming themselves. Peter also was standing with them and warming himself.

18:19 Then the high priest questioned Jesus about his disciples and about his teaching.

18:20 Jesus answered, “I have spoken openly to the world; I have always taught in synagogues and in the temple, where all the Jews come together. I have said nothing in secret.

18:21 Why do you ask me? Ask those who heard what I said to them; they know what I said.”

18:22 When he had said this, one of the police standing nearby struck Jesus on the face, saying, “Is that how you answer the high priest?”

18:23 Jesus answered, “If I have spoken wrongly, testify to the wrong. But if I have spoken rightly, why do you strike me?”

18:24 Then Annas sent him bound to Caiaphas the high priest.

18:25 Now Simon Peter was standing and warming himself. They asked him, “You are not also one of his disciples, are you?” He denied it and said, “I am not.”

18:26 One of the slaves of the high priest, a relative of the man whose ear Peter had cut off, asked, “Did I not see you in the garden with him?”

18:27 Again Peter denied it, and at that moment the cock crowed.

18:28 Then they took Jesus from Caiaphas to Pilate’s headquarters. It was early in the morning. They themselves did not enter the headquarters, so as to avoid ritual defilement and to be able to eat the Passover.

18:29 So Pilate went out to them and said, “What accusation do you bring against this man?”

18:30 They answered, “If this man were not a criminal, we would not have handed him over to you.”

18:31 Pilate said to them, “Take him yourselves and judge him according to your law.” The Jews replied, “We are not permitted to put anyone to death.”

18:32 (This was to fulfill what Jesus had said when he indicated the kind of death he was to die.)

18:33 Then Pilate entered the headquarters again, summoned Jesus, and asked him, “Are you the King of the Jews?”

18:34 Jesus answered, “Do you ask this on your own, or did others tell you about me?”

18:35 Pilate replied, “I am not a Jew, am I? Your own nation and the chief priests have handed you over to me. What have you done?”

18:36 Jesus answered, “My kingdom is not from this world. If my kingdom were from this world, my followers would be fighting to keep me from being handed over to the Jews. But as it is, my kingdom is not from here.”

18:37 Pilate asked him, “So you are a king?” Jesus answered, “You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.”

18:38 Pilate asked him, “What is truth?” After he had said this, he went out to the Jews again and told them, “I find no case against him.

18:39 But you have a custom that I release someone for you at the Passover. Do you want me to release for you the King of the Jews?”

18:40 They shouted in reply, “Not this man, but Barabbas!” Now Barabbas was a bandit.

19:1 Then Pilate took Jesus and had him flogged.

19:2 And the soldiers wove a crown of thorns and put it on his head, and they dressed him in a purple robe.

19:3 They kept coming up to him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” and striking him on the face.

19:4 Pilate went out again and said to them, “Look, I am bringing him out to you to let you know that I find no case against him.”

19:5 So Jesus came out, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe. Pilate said to them, “Here is the man!”

19:6 When the chief priests and the police saw him, they shouted, “Crucify him! Crucify him!” Pilate said to them, “Take him yourselves and crucify him; I find no case against him.”

19:7 The Jews answered him, “We have a law, and according to that law he ought to die because he has claimed to be the Son of God.”

19:8 Now when Pilate heard this, he was more afraid than ever.

19:9 He entered his headquarters again and asked Jesus, “Where are you from?” But Jesus gave him no answer.

19:10 Pilate therefore said to him, “Do you refuse to speak to me? Do you not know that I have power to release you, and power to crucify you?”

19:11 Jesus answered him, “You would have no power over me unless it had been given you from above; therefore the one who handed me over to you is guilty of a greater sin.”

19:12 From then on Pilate tried to release him, but the Jews cried out, “If you release this man, you are no friend of the emperor. Everyone who claims to be a king sets himself against the emperor.”

19:13 When Pilate heard these words, he brought Jesus outside and sat on the judge’s bench at a place called The Stone Pavement, or in Hebrew Gabbatha.

19:14 Now it was the day of Preparation for the Passover; and it was about noon. He said to the Jews, “Here is your King!”

19:15 They cried out, “Away with him! Away with him! Crucify him!” Pilate asked them, “Shall I crucify your King?” The chief priests answered, “We have no king but the emperor.”

19:16 Then he handed him over to them to be crucified. So they took Jesus;

19:17 and carrying the cross by himself, he went out to what is called The Place of the Skull, which in Hebrew is called Golgotha.

19:18 There they crucified him, and with him two others, one on either side, with Jesus between them.

19:19 Pilate also had an inscription written and put on the cross. It read, “Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews.”

19:20 Many of the Jews read this inscription, because the place where Jesus was crucified was near the city; and it was written in Hebrew, in Latin, and in Greek.

19:21 Then the chief priests of the Jews said to Pilate, “Do not write, ‘The King of the Jews,’ but, ‘This man said, I am King of the Jews.'”

19:22 Pilate answered, “What I have written I have written.”

19:23 When the soldiers had crucified Jesus, they took his clothes and divided them into four parts, one for each soldier. They also took his tunic; now the tunic was seamless, woven in one piece from the top. 19:24

So they said to one another, “Let us not tear it, but cast lots for it to see who will get it.” This was to fulfill what the scripture says, “They divided my clothes among themselves, and for my clothing they cast lots.”

19:25 And that is what the soldiers did. Meanwhile, standing near the cross of Jesus were his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene.

19:26 When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple whom he loved standing beside her, he said to his mother, “Woman, here is your son.”

19:27 Then he said to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” And from that hour the disciple took her into his own home.

19:28 After this, when Jesus knew that all was now finished, he said (in order to fulfill the scripture), “I am thirsty.”

19:29 A jar full of sour wine was standing there. So they put a sponge full of the wine on a branch of hyssop and held it to his mouth.

19:30 When Jesus had received the wine, he said, “It is finished.” Then he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.

19:31 Since it was the day of Preparation, the Jews did not want the bodies left on the cross during the sabbath, especially because that sabbath was a day of great solemnity. So they asked Pilate to have the legs of the crucified men broken and the bodies removed.

19:32 Then the soldiers came and broke the legs of the first and of the other who had been crucified with him.

19:33 But when they came to Jesus and saw that he was already dead, they did not break his legs.

19:34 Instead, one of the soldiers pierced his side with a spear, and at once blood and water came out.

19:35 (He who saw this has testified so that you also may believe. His testimony is true, and he knows that he tells the truth.)

19:36 These things occurred so that the scripture might be fulfilled, “None of his bones shall be broken.”

19:37 And again another passage of scripture says, “They will look on the one whom they have pierced.”

19:38 After these things, Joseph of Arimathea, who was a disciple of Jesus, though a secret one because of his fear of the Jews, asked Pilate to let him take away the body of Jesus. Pilate gave him permission; so he came and removed his body.

19:39 Nicodemus, who had at first come to Jesus by night, also came, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, weighing about a hundred pounds.

19:40 They took the body of Jesus and wrapped it with the spices in linen cloths, according to the burial custom of the Jews.

19:41 Now there was a garden in the place where he was crucified, and in the garden there was a new tomb in which no one had ever been laid.

19:42 And so, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and the tomb was nearby, they laid Jesus there.

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StJohnsAshfield StainedGlass JohnTheBaptist Paul

StJohnsAshfield StainedGlass JohnTheBaptist Paul (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Stop! Read no further until you have read: https://tyragan.wordpress.com/2013/02/02/fall-out-chapter-four/

Two weeks after the Anglican Massacre.

The Christianities are still reeling from the Anglican Massacre. Nearly 100 people dead with the bombing of the Cathedral, the more tragic response though for the branch of the Tree of Christ, is that the Anglican Church in Canada announced the dissolution of and the sale of properties of the Diocese, leaving the parishners of this church in a sea of grief and trauma that my former employer in the Roman Catholic Diocese was more than willing to sweep in and pick up converts to show a healthy growth this quarter.

The hot water of the shower hit my face and cleanly shaved head, running down. First time that I was thinking with a clear head since that night when we failed to save lives, but we succeeded in catching the killer, Dwayne Douglas an elder in a congregation that voted on whether or not individuals were “Christian” enough to join their churches. He played holy well, and no one realized the socio path they had allowed to climb the ranks of the lay leadership of their church. Although the cult like status this congregation afforded their pastor was creepy and actually at the announcement of the killer being from there, a member contacted Bronwyn to disclose that she was concerned about other illegal activities as the pastor had convinced her to leave her husband that the church saw as a heretic.

The police are following up, because the Holy knows Sherwood does not need a Jonestown or Branch Davidian. But it has revealed that there is something missing within the divided soul that is the religious landscape of Sherwood. I feel the Holy Mystery speaking to me as St. Francis heard from the Cosmic Christ in the chapel of San Damiano.

Stepping out of the shower and into jeans and a superman t-shirt I step into the living room. Bronwyn is just completing her yoga, she is beautiful and oh so patient. “It’s time B.”

She stops mid pose of the crane, and straightens. She looks at me. “B, you haven’t called me that since college.” The corners of her mouth are turning up oh so slightly. “What is going through that mind of yours?”

I pick up the cordless phone and dial a number from memory. “Lao, meet me at the ruins, drop Tariq a line as well.”

I think Bronwyn just squealed. But she is attempting to look composed. Almost eight months since power hungry men abusing the name of God to get more power stole my soul from me it is time to reclaim it. “You’re going back?”

“Going forward.” I don’t know what seizes me but next thing I know the phone hits the laminate and she is in my arms, our lips meet. “I Love you.”

The transformational love of the Holy Mystery that exists within all of creation, and all of creation exists within (panentheism) is what this city needs, a surrendering of labels, and an embracing of compassion. No longer Muslim, Buddhist or Christian or any other designation…we are all human, learning and living compassionate lives… discovering that the bedrock is not to be loved, or simply love, but to be an action verb to seek out TO Love.

That is the call of the Holy Mystery after this carnage, that microcosmically reflects our current world, yet we are all called to this idea to live out actively loving one another.

 

This is My command: Love one another as I have loved you.

Jesus of Nazareth,

Recorded and reported according to the Community of the Apostle John in the Gospel that bears his name 15:12

A New Adventure Begins?

 


 

year we would like to see your parishes take a few minutes to think about consciously including AYC in your parish plans and budget.

 

We hope families with children will consider a week at camp in August for your children.

 

At AYC, we had 34 parishes represented among our campers and staff last year. Of the 83 parishes in our Diocese last year, only four parishes donated money to sponsor 12 children who needed bursaries. Yet those 12 children were from eight different Anglican parishes.

 

We have been blessed by a number of individuals donors to our camp who do not even belong to an Anglican parish yet want to make sure we never have to say no to a request that a child go to camp.

 

Special thanks goes out to all those who recognize the importance of this ministry. We could never do it without all of you. Because we rent the site with kitchen and support staff included, we incur extra expenses.

 

In the past, the Diocese has not included AYC in their annual budget. However, we have been very grateful when the Diocese covers our deposits and any shortfalls we may have incurred.

 

This past fall as we welcomed our new Bishop, the Executive blessed us with a one-time gift to help us with our deposits for the coming year.

 

There is also a group of people who volunteer hours of their time to work at camp, plus donate supplies to keep camp going. We could not operate without the commitment of these people.

 

AYC is held for two weeks in August at a site we rent on Red Deer Lake (west of Hobbema) called Livings Springs Bible Camp. Over the last several years, we have built a wonderful relationship with the Living Springs Board and Staff.

 

Living Springs is owned and operated for the summer months as a joint venture between six local Evangelical Churches. We have reached approximately 100 children each year. We could accommodate 75 children each week.

 

This is where you come in. Spread the word to every family you meet. Perhaps your parish would consider sponsoring children connected to your parish.

 

No children? A donation to AYC directly will help sponsor children whom you may not know but whose parents may not be able to afford the full fee. The AYC philosophy is that every child should be able to attend camp. The cost to sponsor one child is $330 and through the Diocese, we can offer a tax-deductible receipt for your donations.

 

If you feel you would like to get involved with this important ministry or would like to learn more about what we do, then we would like to invite you to our Annual Camp Reunion and Dessert fundraiser on March 3, 2007 at Holy Trinity Church, 18 Hidden Creek Road N.W. from 2-4pm.

 

We will have desert, a silent auction and lots of pictures from past camps. Itʼs a chance to visit old camp friends and to get a real feel for what camp is all about. I challenge every parish to send someone to our reunion to see what camp means to the children who attend. Better still send one child to camp.

 

Lastly, we ask all of you for your prayers. Pray that we receive the children to attend, the volunteers to staff camp and the funds to pay our way. This is a Diocesan ministry and our hope is that every parish large or small with children or not, will see the importance of this ministry and find it in their hearts to participate in some small way.

 

Please visit our website for more information. http://www.anglicanyc.ca or call us directly on our AYC phone (403)835-3555. See you at the reunion!

Sheila Taylor was

AYC Director for 2006

 

 

 

 

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Summer’s Coming

 

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Free for all at Senior Camp.

 

Fun at Junior Camp.

 

Why Join a

 

Religious Order?

 

by Ty Ragan

 

I began the second phase of my Novitiate with the Third Order, Society of St. Francis of Assisi on the eve of the Feast Day of St. Francis of Assisi (October 4).

 

I watched with joy as the animals God entrusted to us were blessed. A question is asked by a friend as I help him write a term paper in the history of Christian spirituality, why a Religious Order? Why strive to be “of no higher office than that of minor” as Francis phrased it in his earliest Rule?

 

Why? Because it gives me the freedom to move in life among those who need help unhindered by red tape. St. Francis of Assisi is not only the patron of animals and ecology, but also became the patron of political activism. The front line of social justice work came from the spirit of Francis and Clareʼs journey to the heart of Christ.

 

It is a vocation that fits my character, running for office, writing articles or letters, challenging the leaders of our church and nation or simply buying lunch for someone who is hungry or helping someone achieve. Yet then the question arises, isnʼt this what being a Christian is all about?

 

The answer is yes. Part of it is community. Itʼs being connected internationally with brethren that share the same heart of faith.

 

But it is more than community. Part of it is accountability. But you can also find that by being part of Cursillo, TEC or any host of other men or womenʼs ministries.

 

Recently I have been going through a rough patch of discouragement in my calling. Itʼs not about my vocation, for my vocation is Franciscan. Currently my calling is ministry to youth and children in the church. I also work with Hull Child & Family Services.

 

That is the joy of the Gospel life. The Holy Spirit moved within me over a year and a bit as I wrote my personal Rule of Life to be a Franciscan. Over this past year I have been living this rule more consciously.

 

The rule is designed to be general enough for life, yet specific enough to constantly cause growth in ministry in the world.

 

I am in the home stretch as I move towards life profession. In my heart I know this is where I should be. But in the religious life it is a community decision reached through prayer.

 

My vocation is not mine alone, but a community decision. This goes back to the earliest rule where Francis wrote about missionaries. He said their calling had to be seen by the friars, the priest, and the church. They had to be willing to learn about the culture and become fluent in the language.

 

I am a missionary. I have to remember that. A document challenges me to never give up. The religious life is not for every believer. It is a call to obedience, simplicity, prayer, and action.

 

It is a call never to remain silent when injustice is seen and to help those who are in need. It is a challenge to daily examination and transformation. As Francis wrote in those early days about education; a brother should not move on from one teaching of. Jesus until it is inwardly digested and outwardly lived out.

 

To be a Franciscan is to literally live out the heart of Christ in the world. The answer is simple for me when I am asked why the Religious Life? It is the same for all of us; God called and I answered.

Ty Ragan is a lay Franciscan working in ministry to youth and children at St. Georgeʼs Anglican Church, Calgary. He is a frequent contributor to the Sower.

(http://www.calgary.anglican.ca/Sower/2007/SowerFeb07.pdf p.8)