Posts Tagged ‘Lent’


Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no one has gone before.

-Captain (Admiral) James T. Kirk opening monologue to Star Trek; Star Trek the Animated series and Star Trek I thru VI

Ah Star Trek, a good sci-fi world to explore many things of morals/ethics and yes, even spirituality.  Thanks to the wonders of Netflix Canada I have had the fun of re-discovering the animated series, a simple 22 episodes from 1973-74. It was a show designed as a continuation of the original Star Trek series, though declared outside of canon. Which frankly I don’t give a damn about, I enjoy good stories with characters I love, this idea of which is to be paid attention to is simply a pain in the butt. Anyways, I digress and back on point. (Full episode guide here.)

The show was fun because with animation instead of live action many more aliens could be added to the crew and worlds, as well, many new things could happen. Many of the scripts were adapted from those that were too costly to make a go on the original show. Much like the comics series and book series that followed the shows, it opened up new alien worlds explore.

The series was voiced by most of the original crew, sans Walter Koenig due to financial constraints, but Leonard Nimoy refusing to be apart of the series if the rest could not speak to a high volume of community and friendship. Yet Koenig was not absent from the series, he was the first Trek actor to writer a Star Trek story in season one’s episode The Infinite Vulcan.

It is a story of creation of a master race, imposition of peace and what truly emerges as a choice between control and free will.

Is the reader starting to see what can happen with these 23-minute episodes over a 22-week period? They work for all ages with viewing, a group of them could be used during specific times of the church year as well (ala Advent or Lent) as a special discussion series.

They are stories that can be tied into discussions, teachings for all ages, or used to craft a specific children curriculum for a part of the children’s ministry as each episode would lend itself to game/craft creation out of the story, and can easily tie into different topics from the epistles.

Considering season one’s episode Mudd’s Passion is a treatise on living as you were truly created (a nod to St. Paul’s writings in Romans that have been oh so misinterpreted as scriptures of pain over time).  There are 21 other short stories like this, that are accessible for all ages.

Basically, I do not want to offer up what a curriculum could look like for spiritual growth and direction. I do not want to say it should only be tied to the Christian Bible, for it can be used within any religious or humanist settings (as Gene Rodenberry was a rationalist humanist). What it is, is another medium for discovery and learning that can be overlooked so easily.

What it takes is someone willing to be creative. Someone who is good with craft/game/music creation or working with kids/adults to create these things on their own. Tying it into some discussion questions and launching. One thing I always stood on when I was working in churches was that money is not what was needed to create multi-generational communities. What was needed was passion, fun and purpose that when lived out becomes contagious. It creates the space for belonging for all, and that is the space that is needed.

Here is some thoughts on a simple tool that can be used.

And to quote Captain Jean-Luc Picard…

“To Boldly go where no one has gone before.”

 

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Seven Reasons Why Young Adults Quit Church

by Christian Piatt 03-11-2012 | 3:59pm
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Image via Raywoo/Shutterstock.com

Image via Raywoo/Shutterstock.com

From time to time I revisit the question: Why are young adults walking away from religion?

Although the answer(s) vary from person to person, there are some general trends that I think apply in most cases. (In the list below, when I refer to “we,” “I” or “me,” I’m referring to younger adults in general, and not necessarily myself.)

We’ve Been Hurt: I can actually include myself in this one personally. Sometimes the hurtful act is specific, like when my youth leader threw a Bible at me for asking the wrong questions. Sometimes it’s rhetorical, either from the pulpit, in a small group study or over a meal. Sometimes it’s physical, taking the form of sexual abuse or the like. But millions claim a wound they can trace back to church that has never healed. Why? In part, because the church rarely seeks forgiveness.

Adult Life/College and Church Don’t Seem to Mix: There are the obvious things, like scheduling activities on Sunday mornings (hint: young people tend to go out on Saturday nights), but there’s more to it. In college, and before that by our parents, we’re taught to explore the world, broaden our horizons, think critically, question everything and figure out who we are as individuals. Though there’s value in this, it’s hyper-individualistic. But Church is more about community. In many ways, it represents, fairly or not, sameness, conformity and a “check your brain at the door” ethos. This stands in opposition to what the world is telling us is important at this time in life.

Perhaps an emphasis on a year of community service after high school would be a natural bridge to ameliorate some of this narcissism we’re building in to ourselves.

There’s No Natural Bridge to Church: Most teenagers leave home, either for college, to travel, work or whatever after high school. With the bad economy, this number is fewer, but it’s a general trend. But the existing model of church still depends on the assumption that communities are relatively static, and that the church is at the center of that community. Not so anymore. When I went to college, I was contacted by fraternities, campus activity groups and credit card companies, but not one church. The only connection I had with religion was the ridiculous guy who (literally) stood on a box with a bullhorn in the union garden and yelled at us about our sinful ways. I could have used support in how to deal with my own finances for the first time. I could have used a built-in network of friends. I would have loved a care package, an invitation for free pizza at the local restaurant or help with my laundry. What I got was the goof with the bullhorn.

We’re Distracted: I shared a video by Diana Butler Bass in a recent post about a priest who took his Ash Wednesday service out onto the street. When people saw him, they reacted as if they had been shaken out of a deep sleep. “It’s Ash Wednesday!” they said with surprise as they asked for the ashes. “Lent is starting!” It simply wasn’t on their radar. It’s not that we don’t care; we have so many things competing for our limited time and attention that the passive things that don’t offer an immediate “interrupt” get relegated to the “later” pile. And we rarely ever get to the “later” pile, which leads me to the next point…

We’re Skeptical: We’re exposed to more ad impressions in a month today than any other previous generation experienced in a lifetime. I’m sitting in a hotel room writing this, and in this room (which I paid for in part to have privacy), I see more than a dozen marketing messages. If I turn on the TV, they’re there. Pick up my phone, they’re there. Online…you get the point. So whereas generations before us expended energy seeking information out, now it comes at us in such overwhelming volumes that we spend at least the same amount of energy filtering things out. This leads to somewhat of a calcifying of the senses, always assuming that whoever is trying to get your attention wants something, just like everyone else.

We’re Exhausted: I was lumped in as pat of the Generation X group, also known as the Slacker Generation. This implied, of course, that we were lazy and unmotivated. But consider how many of us go to college, compared to generations before us. And consider that the baseline standard for family economics requires a two-income revenue stream to live in any level of the middle class. Debt and credit are givens, and working full-time while also trying to maintain a marriage, raise kids, have friends and – God forbid – have some time left for ourselves leaves us with less than nothing. We’re always running a deficit. So when you ask me to set aside more time and more money for church, you’re trying to tap already empty reserves.

I Don’t Get It: Young adults today are the most un-churched generation in a long time. In many cases, it’s not that we’re walking away from church; we never went in. From what I can tell from the outside, there’s not much relevance to my life in there, and I’m not about to take the risk of walking through the door to find out otherwise.

I’ve tried to offer insight into what might be done about a few of these issues as I went, but I invite you also to sit with the tension of not having the answers. Better yet, seek some young adults out, ask them if they relate to these. And see if they have ideas about what you (maybe not even “church” but you) can do to help relieve some of the challenges.

I think the conversation that follows might pleasantly surprise you.

Christian Piatt is the creator and editor of BANNED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE BIBLE and BANNED QUESTIONS ABOUT JESUS. He co-created and co-edits the “WTF: Where’s the Faith?” young adult series with Chalice Press, and he has a memoir on faith, family and parenting — PREGMANCY: A Dad, a Little Dude and a Due Date — set to hit book stores everywhere on April 1, 2012.

(Image via Raywoo/Shutterstock.com)

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English: Ashes imposed on the forehead of a Ch...

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Ash Wednesday Hindu style…


It is a season in the church calendar, noted by the colour green for new life.  I know totally awesome explanation, it happens between the end of the 12 days of Christmas festival and the beginning of Lent. But truly what is Epiphany about?

Each year I sit in church and ponder what is the discovery of new life. The revelation of the divinity of Christ which is given to us through the Gift of the Holy Spirit. This is a time not only to reflect on the visit of the Magi to the Holy Family, but also to reflect on the living faith in ourselves and others. Whether your tradition terms them Saints, Martyrs, or Heroes of the Faith their story (or testimony) is what reflects how Christ manifested (Epiphany) within their souls, and lives.

This struck home this Sunday for me, as my new home church (Crossroads Community Church) brought in the Acting up Drama Presentation on the life of Corrie Ten Boom…a powerful story of the ordinary people God call’s to do extraordinary things.

Over the years on Epiphany I have spent time reflecting on the Magi visitation, but what if a better tradition for the church now is experiencing those of history, recent church history, that have had the miracles of God (miracles that we say do not happen anymore) manifested in their own lives? And use this season of Epiphany to disciple followers to bear witness to the miralces in their own lives and how to share their stories in impactful ways (possibly the use of social media like blogs, vlogs, twitter, facebook, etc)…a new way to share the story of God with his children, and God’s children with her?

How appropriate that this season sees my church family offering their community meal this week…living life through the ordinary into the extraordinary…crafting our story for the now.


Us mainliners love to complain.  It almost appears like we are the general public with the apathy it comes to voting, there’s no point, all politicians are crooks etc.  What are the mainline church members complaints? It’s all about keeping the lights on, all they want is money, if I volunteer they will suck me in for life, the council is toxic.

Are these urban legends true? Possibly yes on every count, yet much like opting out of democracy we wind up with the government we never voted for, so by opting out of offering up our talents, time and treasure do we get the church we disengaged from.  That is a lumbering monolith of an institution spiralling towards extinction while sucking members dry to maintain its structures.

So where does this leave us? In this time of Lent, let us reignite our faith communities.  Let us truly decide to commune with the Holy Mystery and live ouf of Her love for the world. How do we do this? We simply choose to engage, all those fears will vanish if we choose to take leadership, to volunteer in the outreach, social justice, and spiritual formation opportunities.  If we feel the call and approach the pastor and council about lay ministerial leadership within the church, and most importantly if we put our names forward to join the church council.  The status quo exists because the same individuals feel duty bound to keep on trucking because they (rightfully?) believe no one else wants the job.

So let’s allow them to feel the Spirit move and discern where The Holy is taking them in Ministry, by answering the call of the Holy in our own lives, as it was said to St. Francis of Assisi from the crucifix in San Damiano, “Rebuild my church”.

Let the rebuilding begin.


Happy Mardi Gras! Carnivale! Shrove Tuesday! Our grand last day of indulgence before the sombre mood of Lent sets in.

But does Lent need to be so sombre? My thought and belief is NO! Lent is a time for us to draw deeper into the Holy Mystery that some choose to call God, as such it should be a time of jubilation as we bring fresh new practice into our lives to discover the sacred.  So let us celebrate 40 days of renewal, and reinvention.