Posts Tagged ‘Saskatoon’


I must admit outside of the CTV series Flash Forward, Robert J. Sawyer’s work never truly held my attention. But curiosity of hearing a sci-fi novel where Calgary’s Mayor Naheed Nenshi becomes Prime Minister intrigued me (NDP take notes, for it is the end of Mulcair’s leadership and Nenshi’s ascension that led to you forming a government in 2020 in this novel).

Not wanting to deliver to many spoilers from this excellent work, it is set against the backdrop of Quantum Psychology, and truly raises some intriguing ethical questions as humanity is broken down into a 4:2:1 ration (yup all 7 billion of us) into the following categories:

  1. Q1-P-ZED’s-Philosophical Zombies those that exist within life with no internal dialogue, essentially no extra consciousness. The largest group, the followers that are easily used as cannon fodder.
  2.  Q2-Psychopaths is the second largest group, yes it is jarring, those that feel nothing outside themselves.
  3. Q3-Awakened- these are the truly conscious within the world, those that feel and interact with life.

The ethical question within the story is if you had the ability to awaken psychopaths (essentially cure it) and move P-ZED’s up would you? And the real hinge of the decision is that those who are awakened may become psychopaths?

What is your decision? What is your choice?

 


ELCIC INFORMATION

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH IN CANADA
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
Phone
1.204.984.9150 Fax 1.204.984.9185

NEWS RELEASE
From the National
Office of the ELCIC

ELCIC National Convention Delegates Approve Social
Statement on Human Sexuality

Saskatoon, 16 July 2011–Following more
than two hours of debate, delegates of the 2011 ELCIC National Convention
approved a Social Statement on Human Sexuality. The results came late in a day
and were done by written ballot, with 213 votes in favour of the motion and 134
against. 

The document is the
result of a four-year process involving: a study guide, a church-wide feedback
process, a draft statement that allowed for further feedback opportunities, and
the statement. The statement analyzes the current social problem, provides
theological and ethical foundations, and applies insights from the first two
sections to the contemporary situation.

Convention delegates first considered the statement Thursday
evening during a Committee of the Whole session. The Human Sexuality Task Force
introduced the 14-page report and responded to questions and comments from
delegates.

Delegates returned to
debate the matter in a Friday morning business session, and long lines of people
approached the plenary hall microphones to speak for and against the motion. As
on Thursday, comments covered a wide range of subjects, including the
interpretation of scripture, church tradition, theology, and human rights. Many
shared personal stories and many quoted the Bible.

“The statement is honest,” said a delegate in favour of the
statement. “The church is conflicted but the statement full of love and
grace.”

Another delegate said that
the social statement acknowledged homosexual orientation as a genetic reality.
“Our loving God gave them these characteristics,” he said. “The least we could
do is love them the way God does.”

Speaking against the statement, one delegate noted, “Nowhere in
the Bible do I see anything in support of same-sex relationships.” He continued,
“One day we will stand before God and we will be judged not by the UN
Declaration of Rights or the Canadian charter, but by God’s holy laws.”

Others said the statement was not
appropriate at this time for the church. “It’s so ambiguous no one understands
it,” said a delegate. “This isn’t our solid ground that we stand on. After ten
years of debate, we still do not have a consensus. We don’t have anything but
divisions.”

In this midst of this
conversation, delegates considered several motions that proposed to alter the
process of the vote. Delegates approved, almost unanimously, a motion to vote by
written ballot instead of public voting by raising cards. The delegate who
proposed the motion said this more private method would help people to vote
according to their consciences.

Delegates defeated another motion that requested a two-thirds
majority to pass the motion instead of the usual majority of 50 per cent plus
one vote. They also defeated a proposed amendment to provide more material in
the statement’s footnotes.

After the
allotted hour-and-fifteen-minute session during Friday morning’s session, the
question had not yet been called. National Bishop Susan C. Johnson, chair of the
meeting, proposed that delegates return from dinner one hour early to finish the
discussion and vote. She requested that those lined up at microphones maintain
their order until the later session.

After other business and a meal, convention resumed the
discussion in a similar tone. Many people stood up to express earnest opinions
both for and against the statement.

Following an hour of debate, and with people still lined up at
the microphones, a delegate asked for the question to be called.

Delegates voted on whether to call the
question and the results were announced as 166 in favour and 162 against. As
convention moved on to consider the adoption of the social statement, a steward
announced that there had been an error with the previous count and the majority
of delegates had voted not to call the question.

After a brief time of reflection, Bishop Johnson sited
Bourinot’s Rules of Order and ruled the decision to call the question stood
since delegates had proceeded in good faith according to information from the
stewards. A motion was made to challenge the chair, but delegates upheld the
decision of the chair.

The original
vote to approve the proposed Social Statement on Human Sexuality resumed, and
after voting, delegates heard a presentation and several announcements. They
then finally stood to sing hymns together.

At around 7:30 p.m., Bishop Johnson announced the statement had
been adopted by a vote of 213 to 134, plus two spoiled ballots. Following the
announcement and prayer, Bishop Johnson acknowledged the ongoing divisions in
the church and celebrated the continued unity that the church has in Christ.

The ELCIC Social Statement on Human
Sexuality is available online at:
elcic.ca/Human-Sexuality/default.cfm.

Over 500 Lutherans and special guests are
meeting in Saskatoon at the ELCIC’s 13th National Convention. Full agenda
details, highlights, and a live link to the proceedings are available on the
National Convention website: elcic.ca/In-Convention/2011-Saskatoon.

—————————————————————–
The
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination
with 152,500 baptized members in 607 congregations. It is a member of the
Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World
Council of Churches.

Material provided through ELCIC Information is
intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner
they may find useful.

For more information, please contact:
Trina
Gallop, Director of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B
3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

Subscribe or
unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short
message.


ELCIC INFORMATION

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH IN CANADA
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B 3H6
Phone
1.204.984.9150 Fax 1.204.984.9185

NEWS RELEASE
From the National
Office of the ELCIC

Delegates to 2011 ELCIC National Convention
Approve Motions on Unity, Same-Sex Blessings and Qualifications for
Ordination

Saskatoon, 17 July 2011 — Delegates of the 13th Biennial
ELCIC National Convention approved three highly anticipated and vigorously
debated motions related to the ELCIC Social Statement on Human Sexuality.
Delegates approved an Affirmation Concerning the Unity of the Church; a policy
statement allowing rostered ministers to preside at or bless legal marriages,
including those between same-sex couples, according to the laws of the province;
and a policy paving the way for the ordination and installation of gay and
lesbian pastors.

These motions, put forth by National Church Council
(NCC), were drafted by the ELCIC Faith, Order and Doctrine Committee “to allow
us to move forward if the Social Statement on Human Sexuality was approved,”
said committee member and Saskatchewan Synod Bishop Cindy Halmarson. The social
statement itself was approved during Saturday’s business sessions, following
more than two hours of debate.

Affirmation Concerning the Unity of
the Church (Motion #26)


Passed
by a vote of 204 to 133, the affirmation states that the church should: not be
divided because of disagreement over moral issues and that ELCIC members,
congregations, synods, and churches who disagree with one another remain in
dialogue and unity; maintain unity in the gospel and the sacraments; refrain
from actions that will divide the body of Christ.

Delegates offered a
wide range of perspectives during the debate from serious reservations to
gratitude.

“I speak against the motion,” said one delegate. “The fruit
of the spirit are love, peace and joy, and since we have discussed this issue,
there has been no peace, love, or joy.”

“We are losing the heart of our
people, and it shows in their giving,” expressed another delegate. “You can not
legislate the hearts of the people we are serving.”

One church member
expressed her appreciation for the work of the committee and NCC for putting
forth the motion and offered this comment: “I have consulted with theologians
and biblical scholars, and they have verified that in the original language ‘to
love one another as I have loved you’ there is no ‘except’ or ‘but.’”

Delegates cast their votes as the last order of business on Saturday
night. “I want to commend you for the respect and patience you’ve shown,”
concluded National Bishop Susan C. Johnson following the announcement of the
vote results.

Motion on Same-Sex Blessings (Motion
#27)


Passed by a vote of 192 to
132, Motion #27 allows ELCIC rostered ministers to preside at or bless marriages
according to the dictates of their consciences and according to the laws of the
province in which they serve, including those of same-sex couples.

Early
in the debate, a delegate made a procedural motion to table the discussion until
the 2013 National Convention. “I believe the motions we have passed are a good
framework to build on. I am suggesting we take a bit of time to let this
document breathe before we take further steps,” he said.

The motion to
postpone failed, and debate continued.

“I’ve heard several people say
that this issue has been dealt with, but the status quo is unacceptable—to love
the sinner and hate the sin,” said one delegate. “That is hate, discrimination,
exclusion and alienation. That is saying I can ride the bus but sit at the back.
That is not love. That is not what Jesus would do.”

“I have serious
misgivings about how this might play out in practical terms,” expressed a
delegate. “The day will come when a couple will ask to be married in a
congregation that won’t participate in that kind of service. What will be the
ramifications?”

Another speaker encouraged delegates to open the door
for the congregations who do wish to participate in same-sex blessings. “I speak
in favour of this motion even though I know I won’t be performing these
marriages,” he said. “My congregation has made its position clear: it is not a
place they are prepared to go. As a pastor, I can marry couples because I have
been called by that congregation. I marry in their name, and it behooves me to
consider their wishes. I would be surprised if these marriages happen in five
per cent of our congregations. But the question is, can we still work with the
congregations that will do this? Let them do their ministry as we do ours.”

National Bishop Johnson led the delegates in song (Lord Listen to
Your Children Pray
) as ballots were cast.

Motion on Rostered
Ministry (Motion #28)

Passed by a vote of 205 to 114, Motion #28
states that sexual orientation is not in itself a factor that disqualifies a
candidate for rostered ministry. The motion rescinds two past convention actions
that disallowed self-declared, practicing homosexuals to be approved for
ordination and call.

“I thank you for your love and patience during this
debate. On behalf of my congregation, I speak against the motion,” said one
delegate. “It is against God’s will and Gods word, the Bible.”

“When I
look at my experience of 20 years, I can’t see that anything good has come from
church’s current policy on this issue,” said Eastern Synod Bishop Michael Pryse.
“I’ve seen the terrible results of this policy: broken people, broken families,
broken congregations, substance abuse, broken lives. That’s what happens when
you demand celibacy of those who don’t have the gifts to live celibate lives.
This motion provides the opportunity for willing congregations to consider these
candidates.”

“I urge you to not vote for this,” expressed a rostered
delegate. “Will congregations be allowed to ask a candidate’s orientation? Are
we opening a can of worms for congregations that are on the orthodox side? Will
pastors have to hide their orientation to get a job? Is this a decision that’s
made too soon?”

At the end of the debate, one rostered delegate
broke her silence. “I rise to speak in favour, and I do so praising God, for I
am fearfully and wonderfully made. God made me gay, and I celebrate God’s gift,”
she said. “This church has nurtured me and helped me become the person I am. As
I prepared myself to take this call, no one ever asked me about my sexuality,
but we were told we could stay if we were celibate or silent. Today I break my
silence on behalf of my sisters and brothers who cannot speak. I implore that
gifted gays and lesbians may be embraced, empowered and sent.”

Over 500
Lutherans and special guests are meeting in Saskatoon, July 14-17 for the
ELCIC’s 13th National Convention. Full agenda details, highlights, and a live
link to the proceedings are available on the National Convention website: elcic.ca/In-Convention/2011-Saskatoon.

—————————————————————–
The
Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada is Canada’s largest Lutheran denomination
with 152,500 baptized members in 607 congregations. It is a member of the
Lutheran World Federation, the Canadian Council of Churches and the World
Council of Churches.

Material provided through ELCIC Information is
intended for reproduction and redistribution by recipients in whatever manner
they may find useful.

For more information, please contact:
Trina
Gallop, Director of Communications
302-393 Portage Ave. Winnipeg MB R3B
3H6
204.984.9172
tgallop@elcic.ca

Subscribe or
unsubscribe to ELCIC Information by emailing info@elcic.ca with a short
message.


 

Chapter Six

Throughout 2005 I came to realize that systemic issues of people infested most, if not all institutions.  I had travelled through political ideologies like I did churches. Between St. Thomas More, and St. George’s Anglican, I landed at Centennial Presbyterian as their youth pastor, and defined my call to the pulpit ministry, and did work with the Young Adult Ministry at Rockyview Alliance Church.  It was during this time I began to take seriously my Franciscan Formation, the idea of contemplation during social justice work.

  This period I dubbed my pilgrimage as I began to do relevant ministry in each of the churches that brought me through my beginning years.  St. George’s was what I believed was the final step.

  I transferred from the Order of Ecumenical Franciscans (www.franciscans.com) and joined the Third Order, Society of St. Francis (www.tssf.org).  It was a good time to be Anglican, as I continued the writing I started with the Presbyterian Record, and transferred on as a writer with the Anglican Sower. These reflections of ministerial practice percolated thought throughout the diocese.

  The vow ceremonies with the TSSF[1] raised awareness of the work being done by laity within the church.  Although one of my non-negotiables came to the forefront.  As the Anglican Church wrestles with what they have dubbed, “the question” pc-talk for whether or not the LGBTTQ community can be classed as full Christians, and discovered that due to church cannon, the differently abled could not always be full participants.

  This began to percolate; as well I saw the ugly money monster once again rear its head.  It was an aging congregation (be honest, the ACC is an aging church that is bordering on irrelevancy sadly), and they were transitioning out of relevant ministries for the community they existed in. This irrelevancy concerned me, because their theological school in Saskatoon, SK (Emmanuel & St. Chad) is doing amazing work equipping the next generation of clergy (I attended two sessions of their Summer School for Laity which was amazing).

 I stepped down to pursue my Doctor of (Holistic) Psychology (seeing if I had the chops for post-grad work, cause I really wanted to pursue a D.Min) and was elected as a People’s Warden. Served all of two months before I got the call to go back to Foothills United, yes it was a church I had a love hate relationship with. My Nanny had been attending there since my Granddad passed away, and it was a good way to spend time with her.

  My sacred practice called me back to my Eastern roots as well (I had loved Aikido), and started into Yoga, Laughing Yoga and Tai Chi.

  I was also now working full time with Hull Child & Family Services HOPE Work Experience Program (since closed down by the Alberta Government) which was a work experience program for the differently abled.

  They were once again in an interim ministry (again the institution that does not play well with others, and the money concerns).  Yet here I was. After beginning to attend I started teaching Sunday School and took over the youth group, basically Rob (the interim minister) asked me to step onto the council as the Christian Education Director (I became a committee of one), and started to experiment with ways to reach out to the community, but also to illuminate the youngest in the church whose average age was 85 years old.


[1] During this time I was involved in a long distance relationship with a girl (yes she was older than me in years, but man was she immature) in Mesa, AZ that was a fundamentalist Christian (don’t ask), aside from the cool parts of travelling the Southwestern U.S. and being in Franciscan Bascillica’s for worship, I tired of hearing how evil sex was, what had to be done to be seen as a “Holy Person” (total hypocrisy in her part)  and why these people would burn. She went back to her porn addicted ex, because he was compliant to the church image, and besides, the sex sucked. Yes I know, TMFI.