Posts Tagged ‘Trudeau’


Simple thoughts before our vote on October 21, 2019 for our next government of Canada. Don’t let the leader or party loyalty outshine the hustle, character and integrity of local candidates. The ballot was finalized on Sept. 30, 2019, So as gotcha politics happen because EDA’s hope that our loyalty is to leader and brand over local, we are left asking where some of these nutters and lemons came from?

They come from apathy to dig on who is local, they come from looking at local and saying that does not fit my party, so I am choosing option B instead.

Because this late in the game, leaders primping firing candidates is just political theatre, once the cameras are away the name is still on the ballot next to the party– and honestly, if they are elected under the party banner will they truly keep them out of caucus without the election run scrutiny? Highly doubtful.

Think. Engage. Demand good local representation.

As well, it is deplorable to watch those elected to other governmental levels in Canada, door knocking and flying out to other provinces in a partisan debacle.

Parachute candidates, whether in the same city or further afield, is a practice that Elections Canada needs to rule on, especially when the candidate states unequivocally they do not have an intention to move to the riding even if elected should be a disqualification.

The English Language Leaders debate on Monday reminded me of a grade school classroom playing sink the sub. In the midst, I must admit, Jagmeet Singh, leader of the New Democratic Party showed he has grown into his role as a national party leader, and as such deserves the growth he is seeing in the polls.

One comment though I heard about the debate stuck in my brain about how fall political discourse in Canada has fallen. The comment was that May and Singh had the same policy yet still argued, trying to paint the fallacy that both parties are essentially the same and a false choice. When in fact what was being shown is two parties that wanted similair outcomes but the path there was different. It is what we used to see in Canadian political debates (provincially and federally) here is the shared vision, here is the road map each party is laying out in our common identity in our diversity. Now choose. May and Singh showed what it was to be parliamentarians. To actualize the constitutional promise of Peace, Order and Good Governance.

Perhaps, the other 4 leaders will learn as well, and our electorate will engage…

To paraphrase Mr. Singh, and something I have said quite a bit, have the courage to vote for what you believe in…not out of fear.


Ah I love to reflect on some of the greatest things Canada has ever done. And it was repatriated away from Britain to us in 1982. The Constitution Act 1982 (an update on the British North America Act 1867 which made us a nation), and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

This is not a digression in the loss of the social charter that was spear headed by then Alberta PC Premier Lougheed. No, it is a reflection on what was accomplished, and for those who are more fluent in the American Bill of Rights, for Canadians what is the key differences. I also always encourage one to read both documents that are the foundation of Canada’s systems.

The act opens:

Whereas Canada is founded upon principles that recognize the supremacy of God and the rule of law:

Guarantee of Rights and Freedoms

One little word, God. But it is not a Judeo-Christian God, it is an anglicized affirmation of the creative force no matter how it is defined. For the charter this leads into, when one dives into the archives had all sectors of society speaking into it including and not limited to: First Nations, Churches, other religions, politicians, and justice.

It opens up the fundamental freedoms section:

Fundamental freedoms

 Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms:

  • (a) freedom of conscience and religion;

  • (b) freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication;

  • (c) freedom of peaceful assembly; and

  • (d) freedom of association.

There are freedoms spoken of, but notice that under (b) it is not speech, but rather expression. Each fundamental freedom flows into the other, and ties not into just simply an individual’s rights, but rights as they exist in the collective communities, the villages that make up Canada. The nations as well, as you go through the other rights you will note we are not about independent singular lives knowing that actions do not have ripple effects in the pond.

Much like how the nation grew, interdependence in spite of labels. Unity within our diversity (a mosaic) is what this reflects. The charter in 1982 was the culmination of work that began in Red River rebellion under the leadership of Louis Riel in 1869 displayed the first human rights bill, which was built upon under Douglas’ Saskatchewan Government, and also federally with Diefenbaker in 1960. But all these bills came out of a sense of community solidarity.

Not just the words on the paper, but the context, the intent…and sadly that is what has been missing a lot in public discourse in my nation. We gravitated to a simpler black and white system without realizing our nation has never been black and white. First Nations, English, and Francophone. Later saw Scottish and Irish fleeing English colonialism coming to Canada; loyalists from the US. Nordic country settlers into the prairies… to the 20th century and 21st century with refugees and new Canadians of all stripes.

Our identity has been forged in our differences. BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY the unity of one nation, under one law of collective rights, for the collective good. Essentially our rights exist up to the point they cause harm to the other, and then we work to welcome the differences of the other into our national fabric to make us better.

For the story of Canada is not one of revolution. It is not a story of religious battles. There are gruesome histories that need to be spoken about in truth, and in reconciliation to move forward from. But as a nation, we have always been driven by answering two questions, since the Skralings rescued the Vikings in Newfoundland…

Who is My neighbour?

And what does it mean to build a community together?

2017 we vote for City Councils and village/town leaderships in Alberta.

2019 is a federal election that currently has two parties searching for identity and leadership.

2020 in Alberta is another election where change can happen for the better.

But it is time as citizens to learn from our neighbours to the south, and what happens when you forget what made you as a people. Not the labels that divide, but what ties you together. No more into a mirror darkly.

2015 the best part of Justin Trudeau was he raised political discourse out of muck racking to a positive spin. Now though is our time to demand better. It is our time to demand political leaders running cast more than management cycles, budget sheets and sprockets–the things the bureaucracy is designed to handle.

Now is the time to demand actual leadership from each riding, from each person running, on their personal level, what is their vision for their village in the collection of villages? We want electoral reform, let’s send visionaries to Ottawa, Edmonton and City councils…not managers. Let’s elect those with heart and passion. Those that understand our national foundation within the Constitution and Charter of Rights & Freedoms.

For these beautiful documents speak to a guarantee the engaged citizens of Canada can hold to, and that is quite beautiful and simple:

Peace, Order and Good Governance.

Let’s dream no little dream. Let’s dream what is possible, and hold ourselves and our leaders to what we said we deserved.

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It is funny as both the former Official Opposition, NDP, try to secure candidates for leadership, and the current Official Opposition, Conservative Party of Canada have a robustness of anglophones running to lead a bi-lingual mosaic of a nation…both decry the Liberals who are currently forming the government.

Yet…

How did Trudeau and his team win the government?

It was by changing the tone of rhetoric. Finally moving away from mudraking and playground bully sounds– to positivism. They chose a term that caught on as most Canadians, regardless of actual socio-economics latched onto as their truth “Middle Class”. It was the sound of something new, and yes there has been movement on some things, back tracking on others as what happens when new Governments begin within their first term, and their first quarter.

But this is not about whether or not I agree with Trudeau’s leadership. It is about what is missing from the public discourse in my country. We have given up expecting vision and excellence in leadership. If you have time, find the archives to listen to past leaders federal and provincial like Tommy Douglas, J.S. Woodshworth, Joe Clark, Pierre Trudeau, Robert Stanford, John Diefenbaker, Lester Pearson, William Aberhart to name but a few. Leaders that did not need soundbites. They had conviction, dreams and visions that were cast, worked on and fulfilled that created the Canada that became a benchmark for the world at large.

Then as a populace we began to accept less from our prospective leaders. And they met where we set the bar.

We have finally pushed it to a level of civility, let’s push it higher. Let’s expect our leaders to leave the sandbox and enter the podium of vision casters once more. CPC/NDP/Greens and the other 13ish available parties federally, are you listening?

Don’t choose the blusteriest person or settle– choose the one that sees the greatness that is the mosaic of Canada, the land of the Just Society, a home for all. Find the one that speaks from the heart, with conviction, and vision that excites to build forward from the foundation laid.

Your party in waiting wants to form the next government, it has to offer those steps beyond just positive politics…. so show us your vision. Show us your heart. Show us your conviction.

For the parties. Know who you are as a gathered community, and find the leader that resonates that outwards brightly, not the other way around.

So politically it is not what is your tweet or sound bite…but truly—

What is your heart for your nation?


Regular followers of my writing will know the last free e-book I tossed up centered on reflections around the Good Samaritan parable from the Christian Gospels. The ethos of the story is simple, a question given to reflect on: Who is My Neighbour?

In the early 1900’s it led J.S. Woodsworth who was superintendent of the Winnipeg Shelter to reflect on this, as his shelter aided immigrant and refugee resettlement into the Canadian prairies. It was the question that led to decisions to march in the General Strike and go to jail.

Now it is time to raise this question as a nation again. For one drowned Syrian boy has sparked outrage in the world about the refugee crisis in Syria. In contemporary/modern western world fashion it is not about vision and answering the call of our shared humanity, it is about managing the spin, the “economic and political cost”; what is the numbers game we should play. In some circles it is creating the divisive debate of whose taxes will pay? It is about choosing between refugees and our current Canadians living in poverty and without homes of their own.

But what if this ancient story held a deeper truth for us in building our national and local communities. Who is my neighbour? Go and do likewise… Provide aid, provide shelter, provide H-O-M-E. Cross international borders, drop stereotypes, and see that at our core we are a shared humanity. Quit stating the issue as helping our own first, and then possibly the other later. It is not that type of issue, or that type of answer.

Help both, nay, help all in need to have a home, and an ability to grow into a new hope, a new community, because of a simple principle of love in this global family.

The question for us as politicians avoid our door steps, a try to duck questions at debates, are we willing to hold the candidates to account to a higher level of dialogue, a higher level of vision…how are they going to build a New Canada where we do not FEAR but WELCOME the strangers at our shores? Where the neighbour in our community is helped before they lose hope and home?

What is the Liberal? Green? NDP? Conservative? Add your own political colour of the rainbow true vision for building a nation that will leave the world in awe for its wonder, inclusion, kindness, empathy, love and beauty? As Tommy Douglas once said, “dream no little dreams” Let us raise the level of debate in our great nation from one of management to one of vision and accountability as citizens of our city, province, country and world.